Intimate Partner Sexual Abuse: Adjudicating This Hidden Dimension of Domestic Violence Cases

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June 2011
  • Fairness in the Courts
  • Violence Against Women and Girls
  • National Judicial Education Program
  • Intimate Partner Sexual Abuse
  • Curriculum

This Model Curriculum was developed out of emerging research documenting that sexual abuse is widespread in the domestic violence context, and that forced sex in addition to physical violence is a leading indicator of potential lethality for victims and their children. Thus, knowing whether there is sexual abuse and forced sex in a violent relationship is a key factor in risk assessment and decision-making in legal cases. The justice system needs strategies that encourage victims to disclose intimate partner sexual abuse and resources for effective offender dispositions and management.

To maximize the opportunities to present this important information, NJEP has created versions of these materials in differing lengths for both civil and criminal court judges, to either be integrated into programs about domestic violence or sexual assault or risk assessment, or presented on their own.

Module Navigation

Civil and Family Court Judges (180 Minutes)

Criminal Court Judges (180 Minutes)

Civil and Family Court Judges (90 Minutes)

Criminal Court Judges (90 Minutes)

Risk Assessment Module (60 Minutes)

Introduction to IPSA (15 Minutes)

For each version there is a Faculty Manual, a PowerPoint presentation, a set of handouts and a Resources CD. For the 180-minute civil and criminal versions there are also interactive exercises.

The Model Curriculum is based on our Intimate Partner Sexual Abuse web course. We created materials for in-person education to make this information available to as many judges and justice system professionals as possible.

Access our Intimate Partner Sexual Abuse Web Course

This project was supported by Grant No. 2008-TA-AX-K051, awarded by the Office on Violence Against Women, U.S. Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, conclusions and recommendations expressed in this publication, program, and/or exhibition are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women.