State Law Guides

  • This companion piece to Legal Momentum's Interactive State Map offers more detail on state laws pertaining to pregnancy discrimination, workplace accommodation for pregnancy-related conditions, rights to request pregnancy-related and family leave, and breastfeeding rights in general. Like this information? Your $10.00 tax-deductible contribution supports our resources and reports.
  • Several states have proposed or enacted laws allowing employers to apply for restraining orders to prevent violence, harassment, or stalking of their employees. The laws vary in significant way, such as in terms of whether the employer may seek a restraining order or injunction on behalf of itself rather than on behalf of the employee, and whether an employee who is the target of violence must be consulted prior to the employer's seeking a restraining order.
  • Several states have enacted laws that provide domestic violence victims (and in some states, victims of sexual assault and/or stalking) time off from work to address the violence in their lives and/or that protects victims from employment discrimination related to the violence.
  • State Law Guide -- Domestic and Sexual Violence Workplace Policies by
  • Unemployment Insurance protections for Domestic Violence and Sexual Abuse Victims.
  • Some victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking need to leave their jobs because of the violence in their lives. Others are discharged from their jobs because of the violence. In most states, individuals are ineligible for unemployment benefits if they leave work voluntarily without “good cause” or if they are discharged for “misconduct.” As of the date of this publication, thirty-five jurisdictions have passed laws that explicitly provide unemployment insurance to domestic violence victims in certain circumstances.
  • Several states have proposed or enacted laws allowing employers to apply for restraining orders to prevent violence, harassment, or stalking of their employees. The laws vary in significant ways, such as whether the employer may seek a restraining order or injunction on behalf of itself rather than on behalf of the employee and whether an employee who is the target of violence must be consulted prior to the employer’s seeking a restraining order.
  • Many domestic violence victims report losing their housing due, at least in part, to the violence in their lives. Several jurisdictions have enacted laws specifically indicating that domestic violence victims are protected from housing discrimination.
  • The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) included several provisions for modernizing state unemployment insurance systems, such as providing access to unemployment insurance benefits to various groups who were not previously covered by state laws, including victims of domestic violence.