Domestic violence

  • Legal Momentum is calling on all employers, no matter how large or small, to adopt the “This Workplace Is a DV-Free Zone Bill of Rights” and put into place a policy that ensures that victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, dating violence, and stalking are safe at work.
  • Several states have enacted laws that provide domestic violence victims (and in some states, victims of sexual assault and/or stalking) time off from work to address the violence in their lives and/or that protects victims from employment discrimination related to the violence.
  • State Law Guide -- Domestic and Sexual Violence Workplace Policies by
  • NOTE: Due to space constraints, the article published in The Judges Journal omitted endnotes. The endnotes are available from the author, see PDFs for download below.
  • The ordinances get the abuse backward. “It’s like saying if somebody gets burglarized they’re going to be kicked out of their house,” said Penny Venetis, executive vice president and legal director at the advocacy organization Legal Momentum. “If you’re the victim of a crime, how could you possibly be evicted from your house?”It can have devastating consequences. “Women should not have to choose between being homeless and staying alive or keeping their children alive,” Venetis said. But “really that’s the choice you’re forcing them to make.”
  • Legal Momentum's Senior Vice President and Director of the National Judicial Education Program, Lynn Hecht Schafran, and Vice President for Government Relations, Lisalyn Jacobs, worked together with a small group of organizations to meet with the Department of Justice’s Special Litigation Section to urge them to issue a Guidance on Gender-Biased Policing. This is the group's formal request letter to Attorney General Loretta Lynch, which was circulated to organizations across the country requesting them to sign on.
  • This interview with National Judicial Education Program Project Attorney Claudia Bayliff discusses the language that is used to describe sexual violence, the importance of language choices, and how language shapes perceptions. Ms. Bayliff frequently presents on this topic to multidisciplinary audiences around the country. The program is also available as an online curriculum, Raped or “Seduced?” How Language Helps Shape Our Perceptions of Sexual Violence.
  • Legal Momentum's President and CEO, Carol Robles-Román, and Elisa Massimino, President and CEO of Human Rights First, wrote this Miami Herald Op-Ed piece calling on the Obama administration to end the detention of immigrant families.
  • This Workplace Is a DV-Free Zone Webinar Slides
  • Originally presented on April 17, 2015.The webinar reviews the importance of having a policy that addresses situations where the employee is either a victim or a perpetrator of domestic violence, sexual violence, dating violence, or stalking; principles that inform an effective policy; and features of Legal Momentum’s model policy. 
  • A woman needs time off from work because she is relocating to a domestic violence shelter to escape her husband’s violence.An unknown person shows up at the office and demands to see his girlfriend, who is an employee there; he threatens that he won’t leave until she agrees to see him.An employee repeatedly uses office phone lines and email to harass and threaten his ex-girlfriend.If you’re an employer, chances are that you have encountered one of the three scenarios listed above. If you haven’t, it’s just a matter of time before you do.
  • Some victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking need to leave their jobs because of the violence in their lives. Others are discharged from their jobs because of the violence. In most states, individuals are ineligible for unemployment benefits if they leave work voluntarily without “good cause” or if they are discharged for “misconduct.” As of the date of this publication, thirty-five jurisdictions have passed laws that explicitly provide unemployment insurance to domestic violence victims in certain circumstances.