Domestic violence

  • Legal Momentum applauds the Obama Administration's announcement yesterday of a number of initiatives that will strengthen families and bring more safety and productivity to workplaces.
  • Legal Momentum had planned this month as a celebratory one to toast the 20th Anniversary of the passage of the Violence Against Women Act and LM’s role.
  • Penny M. Venetis, a Rutgers University law professor, and Carol Robles Román, Legal Momentum's president and CEO, authored an op-ed in The Record calling on Governor Christie to take strong action to combat domestic violence in the state and suggesting the steps he should take.
  • Legal Momentum's President and CEO, Carol Robles Román, is speaking out in the media in the wake of the high-profile Ray Rice domestic violence case, calling for accountability for judges and prosecutors in prosecuting perpetrators, stronger laws to  protect victims and innovative services like Family Justice Centers.
  • Carol Robles-Roman, President and CEO of Legal Momentum, joins Pat and Ellis Henican on how the justice system is wrong in the Ray Rice case on The Ride Home with Pat Kiernan and Rita Cosby  on 77 WABC New York radio,  Friday, September 12, 2014.Show website.
  • This article, written by Lynn Hecht Schafran and published in
  • On Wednesday, March 26, the U.S. Supreme Court delivered an important decision in the case of U.S. vs. Castleman, ruling that someone convicted of minor domestic violence offenses can be barred from possessing guns. Citing a brief in which Legal Momentum participated as co-counsel, the Supreme Court unanimously upheld the provisions of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) that ban gun possession by those who have been convicted in state court of misdemeanor crimes of domestic violence.
  • Women's eNews has published an article today entitled "Women: When We Succeed, We Can Also Escape Abuse" by Legal Momentum's vice president for governmental relations, Lisalyn Jacobs. The article looks at how the economic equity agenda for women can also help curtail domestic violence.
  • 2014 marks the 20th anniversary of the historic passage of the watershed Violence Against Women Act (VAWA)—the first comprehensive federal legislative package designed to end violence against women—which was signed into law in September, 1994 as part of the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994.
  •  Domestic violence is widespread in the United States, affecting individuals of every racial, ethnicity, gender, age, and socioeconomic group. Studies indicate that one of the best predictors of whether a victim will separate from her abuser is the victim’s degree of economic independence. However, domestic and sexual violence can jeopardize a victim’s ability to keep a job. Female domestic and sexual violence victims are more likely than other women to be unemployed, and to suffer from health problems that can affect employability and job performance. 
  • Yellowstone County District Court Judge Todd Baugh, whose comments
  • As part of its observance of Domestic Violence Awareness Month, the US Department of Justice (DOJ) today rolled out its official workplace domestic violence policy for employees.  Legal Momentum's Vice President for Government Relations, Lisalyn Jacobs, was on hand for the occasion.